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Archive for the ‘Software’ Category

Building Your Own NAS: Silverstone DS380 Chassis Tested, Reviewed

August 17th, 2014 1 comment

TechSpot combines some popular NAS components, a Silverstone DS380 case, Asrock C2750D4I motherboard, and FreeNAS.

Assembling your own NAS would net more performance as well because you’d be using a Celeron or Pentium over the Atom or other SoCs, while power shouldn’t be a concern with Haswell using less than 30 watts at idle. As the cherry on top, open source software such as FreeNAS and enclosures like Silverstone’s DS380 should make it less daunting to get started with your homebrewed eight-bay NAS server.

via TechSpot.

The Ars NAS distribution shootout: FreeNAS vs NAS4Free

July 6th, 2014 No comments

Ars Technica takes a look at the most popular NAS distributions available for x86/x86-64 hardware.

Today, we’re going to look at two ready-to-rock ZFS-enabled network attached storage distributions: FreeNAS and NAS4Free.

via Ars Technica.

Categories: FreeNAS, Reviews

DIY simple NAS on budget

December 24th, 2012 2 comments

User mzepan wrote in with a DIY NAS running FreeNAS and sporting a custom case. Check it out here.

Building an Ultra-Low-Power File Server with the Trim-Slice

April 2nd, 2012 1 comment

Linux Journal builds a low power NAS with an Arm-based server and USB hard drives.

As an experiment, and finally to get rid of that large, inefficient and ugly tower case, I decided to use the new Trim-Slice as the base for an ultra-low-power, ultra-small replacement file server. The Trim-Slice is built on the NVIDIA Tegra 2 platform, and the specific model I purchased features a 1GHz dual-core ARM Cortex A9 processor, 1GB of RAM and a 32GB SATA SSD.

via Linux Journal.

Categories: How-To, NFS, Samba, Ubuntu Linux

FLOSS Weekly Episode 198: FreeNAS

February 4th, 2012 No comments

We talk with James Nixon from the FreeNAS project which lets you have a disk storage system on your network at home.

via TWiT.TV.

Categories: FreeNAS

How-To: Set up a home file server using FreeNAS

February 4th, 2012 1 comment

What is FreeNAS you say? Put simply, its is an operating system based on FreeBSD that brings with it a snazzy web interface for management, and all the protocols you need to share files between Windows, Mac and Linux. In other words, a perfect solution for your digital bookshelf. Lets get to it.

via Engadget.

Categories: FreeNAS, How-To

QNAP TS-659 Pro II Review

September 19th, 2011 1 comment

We have been playing around with the QNAP TS-659 Pro II unit over the last month or so. Based on the Intel Atom D525 platform, it has 6 bays and dual GbE ports, making it a candidate for the high end SMB market.

via AnandTech

Categories: Benchmarks, iSCSI, NFS, QNAP, Reviews, Samba

DIY: Home UBUNTU NAS Server

September 5th, 2011 No comments

A detailed blog post which covers hardware and software choices.

For the hardware, I ended up with a fanless MiniITX motherboard Intel D510MO, which has a Atom processor, Gigabit ethernet (all my home network is Gigabit, so it does make a difference). I am also using a 2GB 800Mhz Kingston RAM memory, and both two SATA connectors. The MOBO has up to seven 2.0 USB and one mini PCI Express, in case I want to add more SATA drives in the future.

via DanielAndrade.net

File Server Builder’s Guide

September 4th, 2011 No comments

AnandTech published a great overview of building your own file server, with overviews of current operating system and hardware options.

Whether your budget and storage needs are modest or extensive, we have you covered in the latest builder’s guide to file server systems.

via AnandTech

FreeNAS 8.0 now available

May 5th, 2011 No comments

According to iXsystems developer James T. Nixon III, FreeNAS 8.0 includes major architectural optimisations and is more modular than previous versions. It features a redesigned GUI, built using Python and the Django web framework, that is aimed at making the OS easier to use. ZFS and UFS2 file systems are both supported – ZFS is used as the primary file system.

via The H Open Source

Categories: FreeNAS, News, ZFS

Synology DS211+ SMB NAS Review

February 28th, 2011 No comments

AnandTech dissects, thoroughly reviews, and benchmarks the Synology DS211+:

Synology has a sensible model number nomenclature in which the last two digits refer to the year through which the model is intended for sale. The first set of digits refer to the maximum number of bays supported. Some models have a + at the end, signifying higher performance. Today, we have the DS211+ for review. The DS refers to the product category, Disk Station. 2 indicates a 2 bay model, and the 11 indicates a 2011 model. It is supposed to have a higher performance compared to the DS211 which was released in November 2010.

HP kills Windows Home Server line, claims Vail fail not to blame

December 1st, 2010 1 comment

Soon after it’s discovered that the next version of Windows Home Server will be dropping its drive extender feature, HP decided to drop its Windows Home Server products.

Categories: News, Windows Home Server

Running The Native ZFS Linux Kernel Module, Plus Benchmarks

November 29th, 2010 No comments

Phoronix takes a brand new, unstable ZFS Linux kernel module and benchmarks it agains Btrfs, ZFS-FUSE, EXT4, and XFS with interesting results.

In this article are some new details on KQ Infotech’s ZFS kernel module and our results from testing out the ZFS file-system on Linux.

Categories: Benchmarks, Btrfs, ZFS

Has Microsoft just ruined Windows Home Server?

November 29th, 2010 1 comment

Ars Technica covers the implications of Microsoft removing the Drive Extender feature from Windows Home Server.

Indeed, Drive Extender was fundamental to the home server concept. A home server as originally envisaged by the Windows Home Server team should have, in essence, infinite storage, and storage that should be transparently extensible.

Categories: News, Windows Home Server

How to build a NAS box

July 25th, 2010 1 comment

bit-tech.net has a new article on building a FreeNAS box, including choosing hardware and installing the software.