NAS Drive Prices

Size Western Digital Red Seagate NAS HDD HGST Deskstar NAS
1 TB $69.99 not offered not offered
2 TB $98.00 $99.00 not offered
3 TB $120.99 $119.99 $148.98
4 TB $169.00 $169.70 $184.86
5 TB $225.94 not offered not offered
6 TB $289.99 not offered not offered

More drive prices here. Prices are updated automatically from Amazon.com.

Categories: Hard Drives

ASUS P9A-I/C2550/SAS/4L (Intel Avoton) Server Motherboard Review

Tweak Town reviews and benchmarks a Mini-ITX, passively cooled, 18 drive, 4 NIC, IPMI NAS motherboard by ASUS.

The unique feature of this platform is low power use or green design, which allows it to be run with a passive cooling system. This also offers low running cost with power saving features.

via Tweak Town

Categories: Benchmarks, Reviews

Building Your Own NAS: Silverstone DS380 Chassis Tested, Reviewed

TechSpot combines some popular NAS components, a Silverstone DS380 case, Asrock C2750D4I motherboard, and FreeNAS.

Assembling your own NAS would net more performance as well because you’d be using a Celeron or Pentium over the Atom or other SoCs, while power shouldn’t be a concern with Haswell using less than 30 watts at idle. As the cherry on top, open source software such as FreeNAS and enclosures like Silverstone’s DS380 should make it less daunting to get started with your homebrewed eight-bay NAS server.

via TechSpot.

WD Red Pro Review: 4 TB Drives for NAS Systems Benchmarked

AnandTech reviews and benchmarks a bunch of 4TB NAS and server hard drives.

Categories: Benchmarks, Reviews

The Ars NAS distribution shootout: FreeNAS vs NAS4Free

Ars Technica takes a look at the most popular NAS distributions available for x86/x86-64 hardware.

Today, we’re going to look at two ready-to-rock ZFS-enabled network attached storage distributions: FreeNAS and NAS4Free.

via Ars Technica.

Categories: FreeNAS, Reviews

Storage Pod 4.0: Direct Wire Drives – Faster, Simpler and Less Expensive

Backblaze is back with a new version of their Storage Pod. The major change is that they got rid of their port multiplier backplanes, and instead are going with drives directly attached to two expensive 40-port SATA cards.

The port multipliers have always been a negative aspect of their build to me, as I can see them causing problems, slowing down performance, and being difficult to integrate into a standard PC case. Their replacement is two $700 40-port SATA cards. The downside to these is price, and while I’d love to have one of these cards in my 20-drive file server, it’s out of my budget.

I guess I’ll keep waiting for an affordable, high-port count SATA card.

For the first time since the original Storage Pod, Backblaze is announcing a completely redesigned approach with the introduction of the first “direct wire” Storage Pod. This new Storage Pod performs four times faster, is simpler to assemble, and delivers our lowest cost per gigabyte of data storage yet. And, once again, it’s open source.

via Backblaze Blog 

Synology DiskStation DS214se Review

The DiskStation DS214se is Synology’s economical two-bay NAS with the capability to host, share, and protect data and is optimized to be an personal NAS server running the ever incomparable DiskStation Manager (DSM).

via StorageReview.com

Categories: Reviews, Synology

Enterprise Drives: Fact or Fiction?

Backblaze looks at drive failures in their company and discovers little difference in failure rates of enterprise vs consumer drives.

Via Backblaze Blog » Enterprise Drives: Fact or Fiction?

Categories: Hard Drives, News

Ubuntu Server 13.10 Released with Two Stable SSD Caching Options

Ubuntu Server 13.10 is out, and with it comes the 3.11 kernel with production-ready Bcache and dm-cache SSD caching options. SSD caching can help speed up NAS devices significantly by allowing reads and writes to hit SSDs before slower rotational media.

Ubuntu 13.1o is considered a stable release, although it’s only supported for 9 months. The next release will be 14.04 LTS with 5 years of support.

Information about other server package updates in Ubuntu 13.10 can be found in the release notes.

Categories: News

Battle of the 4 TB NAS Drives: WD Red and Seagate NAS HDD Face-Off

AnandTech reviews and benchmarks the Western Digital Red, Seagate NAS HDD, Western Digital SE, and Western Digital RE 4 TB NAS hard drives.

The correct choice of hard drives for a NAS system is influenced by a number of factors. These include expected workloads, performance requirements and power consumption restrictions, amongst others. In this review, we will discuss some of these aspects while evaluating four different hard drives targeting the NAS market:

via AnandTech | Battle of the 4 TB NAS Drives: WD Red and Seagate NAS HDD Face-Off.

Western Digital Red 4 TB and 2.5″ NAS Drives Released

Western Digital today released a 4 TB 3.5″ Red NAS drive, along with expanding the Red line to include 2.5 inch drives in 750 GB and 1 TB configurations. Storage Review has already published benchmarks for the 4 TB drive and the 1 TB 2.5″ drive.

Categories: Benchmarks, Hard Drives, News

BitTorrent Sync: Turning Your Old Computer into an NAS Drive

The BitTorrent Blog describes how to get BitTorrent Sync running on FreeNAS.

So you’ve upgraded to a new computer. Congratulations. Now you have to decide what to do with that old computer. Give it to your parents? Reenact your favorite scene from Office Space? How about you turn that piece of junk into a Network Attached Storage (NAS) device running BitTorrent Sync. It may not play Crysis, but it will provide you with a plethora of options including FTP, redundant storage, and most importantly, BitTorrent Sync.

via The Official BitTorrent Blog.

Categories: How-To

Recommend a NAS to Linus Torvalds

Linus Torvalds is asking for a NAS recommendation on Google+:

If it runs Linux, that’s obviously a plus, but no, I’m not looking for something to play with. Quite the reverse. I’m looking for something I can ignore and not worry about.

via Linus Torvalds

Categories: Prebuilt NAS, Reviews

How to offload your iTunes library to a NAS

One of its more frustrating aspects is its lack of an officially supported server component—Apple seems stubbornly unwilling to provide a real iTunes server, and so folks who would otherwise happily centrally locate a media library on a perfectly suitable NAS are stuck with islands of music.

via Ars Technica.

Categories: How-To

Ask Slashdot: Easiest Way To Consolidate Household Media? – Slashdot

A recent Ask Slashdot quickly turned into suggestions for setting up every type of NAS possible.

Categories: How-To